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Patrick Curran

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Top Stories by Patrick Curran

This is election time for the JCP: five seats on the Java ME Executive Committee (EC) and five seats on the Java SE/EE EC are up for re-election. All JCP members are eligible to vote and may cast one vote for each seat (hence the recommendation to vote often). The voting process is in two stages. During October members cast their votes for three ratified seats on each EC. (Sun nominates the candidates for these seats.) In November a second round of elections takes place for two elected seats on each EC. (All JCP members may nominate themselves for elected seats.) The ECs play a very important role within the JCP. Not only are they responsible for reviewing and voting on JSRs, but they also serve as the Expert Group for any changes to the organization's Process Document (http://jcp.org/en/procedures/jcp2) - its rules and procedures - and to the Java Specification P... (more)

Java and Free Software in Brazil

A couple of recent Brazil-related news events suggested the theme for this column: Java in Brazil. First, the annual International Free Software Forum (FISL) was recently held in Porto Alegre, Brazil. FISL is one of the world’s most important free software conferences, and more than 7,400 people attended this year, including many from Sun’s Java organization. Second, Sun Microsystems and the Brazilian organization responsible for digital television (DTV) conversion announced  that they would join forces to develop an open source content platform based on Java technolo... (more)

Final Results of the JCP Elections

In October we announced the winners of the first round of this year's JCP elections, during which members voted for three Sun-nominated candidates on each Executive Committee (EC). To refresh your memory, the winners on the Java ME EC were Research in Motion (RIM), Samsung, and Time Warner Cable. The Java SE/EE EC winners were the Apache Software Foundation, Red Hat Middleware, and Nortel.  The second and final round of the elections completed in November. During this round JCP members voted for candidates who nominated themselves for two open seats on each of the two ECs. There... (more)

Java, Open Source, Transparency and Community

In last month's article I wrote about Open Source and Open Standards. This month, having just returned from the QCon conference (http://jaoo.dk/london-2008/conference/) in London, during which I discussed the role of community in the JCP, and particularly the role that individual ("non-corporate") developers could play in the organization, I'd like to address some other aspect of openness: transparency of process and community involvement. Over the past few months I've met with a broad cross-section of the Java developer community - individual developers, members of the open sou... (more)

Java, Security, and Open Source

Now that a significant number of JSRs are being developed as open source projects, I thought it would be interesting to explore the implications of this for security. First, let's start with the basics. Security is fundamental to the Java platform - it's built in to the Java Language and the Java Virtual Machine specifications. In the early days it was expected that a primary use of Java would be "executable content" downloaded from the Web. (See this paper from 1995 on security in Java - "A new programming language from Sun Microsystems".) Obviously the security implications o... (more)